Charm City Bluegrass Festival brings bluegrass to Baltimore this month
Many people show up to the Charm City Bluegrass Festival, held in Druid Hill Park in Baltimore. Photo courtesy of Kaitlyn McClanahan via Brady Cooling Photography.

Charm City Bluegrass Festival brings bluegrass to Baltimore this month

For those looking for outdoor fun in Baltimore this month, the Charm City Bluegrass Festival is right around the corner. This two day festival is happening on April 27 and 28 in Druid Hill Park and is sure to draw huge crowds as it celebrates its sixth year in Baltimore.

With several bluegrass bands in the lineup, like The Devil Makes Three and The Steeldrivers, and family friendly activities like face painting and bubbles along with alcoholic beverages for those over 21, this year’s festival is sure to be a great way to spend a weekend in Baltimore.

Believe it or not, Baltimore has a rich bluegrass tradition, said founders Philip Chorney and Adam Kirr, who started playing small bluegrass shows six years ago that easily began to sell out until they decided to create a bigger festival in Druid Hill Park.

Chorney and Kirr are always searching for ways to improve and grow their festival, so throughout the year, they attend Bluegrass conferences and travel all across the country looking for new bands. “There is never a time when we are not thinking about the festival,” they said.

They try to look for the right blend of music and a lineup that has a mix of music, subgenres and diversity within the bluegrass genre in order for audiences to have a better appreciation for bluegrass as a whole.

Using their business background and skills, they are able to plan for the longevity of the festival, much to the excitement of festival go-ers, with more space, vendors, stages and bands planned for upcoming years.

Their Facebook, Instagram and other mass digital media presence means have been advertising this festival throughout the year and the time has finally come for the fun.

“The best part of the festival is seeing someone you know … who turns to you and realizes that they love bluegrass,” Chorney and Kirr said. “Our number one priority is for everyone to have a good time and to go above and beyond in exceeding their expectations.”

The festival has become a large part of the city’s culture, adding to its rich arts and entertainment culture. The founders are hoping to attract more college students this year and promise that it will be fun for all ages.

Festivals like these are great ways for UMBC students to explore different parts of Baltimore and be part of a great gathering of people who enjoy music and being outside. Rain or shine, this festival will be a great way for all members of the Baltimore community to spend the weekend enjoying bluegrass music with plenty of fun and plenty to do. 

Tickets for the festival are $30 for Friday admission, $62 for Saturday admission or $74 for two-day admission and children under 10 years old get in for free. Pets, coolers, outside food or beverages, coolers and umbrellas are not allowed at the festival.