Nation and World News

Ahmed Eissa

Senior Staff Writer

aeissa2@umbc.edu

United States

United States health officials confirmed on Tuesday that a man who traveled from Liberia to the United States has been diagnosed with Ebola. Another patient, at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., began evaluation for Ebola on Friday.

United States health officials confirmed on Tuesday that a man who traveled from Liberia to the United States has been diagnosed with Ebola. This is the first known case of the virus in the United States associated with the current outbreak in West Africa.

The identity of the man has not been disclosed and he is being treated in isolation in a hospital in Dallas, Texas.

Meanwhile, a patient at Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville, Maryland was suspected to have Ebola, but tested negative for the virus. Another patient, at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C., began evaluation for Ebola on Friday.

The virus has claimed the lives of more than 3,000 people in West Africa since its outbreak. The United States is mounting efforts to prevent Ebola’s spread both at home and abroad.

Mali

The UN has deployed peacekeepers across northern Mali in an effort to secure the region after separatists and Islamists seized control of the north after a coup in the capital in 2012.

Nine United Nations peacekeepers were killed in Mali on Friday when armed gunmen on motorbikes ambushed their convoy. The attack was the deadliest yet on UN troops in Mali.

“They were targeting a convoy that included a fuel truck, knowing full well that an attack on a fuel truck would cause an even greater number of casualties, which adds to the horrendous nature of the crime,” said UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric.

Dujarric also said that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon was shocked and outraged by the attack and called for the assailants to be brought to justice.

Thirty peacekeepers have been killed and 90 have been wounded in Mali since July 2013. The UN has deployed peacekeepers across northern Mali in an effort to secure the region after separatists and Islamists seized control of the north following a coup in the capital in 2012.

 

Myanmar

Various human rights groups condemned a Myanmar government plan on Friday that proposes to force thousands of minority Rohingya Muslims into detention camps indefinitely if they do not qualify for citizenship. The plan outlines that Rohingya must identify themselves as Bengali in order to possible obtain citizenship.

Various human rights groups condemned a Myanmar government plan on Friday that proposes to force thousands of minority Rohingya Muslims into detention camps indefinitely if they do not qualify for citizenship.

The majority of Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims live in the west-coast Rakhine state and are subjected to apartheid-like conditions in the Buddhist-majority country.

The government has refused to grant most Rohingya citizenship and instead refers to them as Bengali, implying that they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. Rohingyas, who have lived in Myanmar for generations, reject this classification.

In 2012 alone, almost 140,000 Rohingya were displaced after violent clashes with ethnic Buddhists in Rakhine.