Study groups improve work ethic
While it appears that the majority of students prefer to study with friends or peers, not everyone will agree to do so. Photo by Kristina Soetje.

Study groups improve work ethic

As the school year progresses, students find themselves spending more time studying than before. As a result, students spend more time creating and participating in study groups. However, not all students find study groups to be effective. Some students find that studying alone is more effective than studying in groups.

One such student is Nikki Kehl, a sophomore computer engineering major. Kehl states that “when studying in groups, working together helps [students] realize [their] mistakes.” This ability to recognize mistakes before turning in an assignment allows students the opportunity to fix their mistakes and get a higher grade.

Kehl also stated another advantage to working in a group while studying is the “ability to share notes and to help each other learn any material that may have been missed while taking notes in class.” This ability to share notes, as well as teaching each other is a vital part of what makes working together in groups so effective.

“By sharing with each other, and helping each other understand the concepts that are being presented in a different way, I find myself understanding more of the concepts,” Kehl added.

However, not everyone agrees with Kehl in the opinion that studying with other students is the most effective or beneficial way to study. One such student, who has asked to remain anonymous, stated that they find it less effective to study in groups due to their studying style. They claimed that they “do better when [they] cram right before a test or an exam, rather than studying beforehand, as [their] ability to remember things short term is greater than [their] ability to remember things over the course of a few study sessions.”

This was not the only cause for this anonymous student to prefer studying alone rather than in a group. They also stated that “when studying with other people, whether it be friends or classmates, [they] feel that the other people are a hindrance rather than helpful.” They believe this because “the other people can provide distractions, and conversations can get off track quickly when working with other people.”

Surprisingly, not as many students agree with this student in believing the cost of studying with others outweighs the benefits. Out of a group of students that were randomly interviewed in the commons, a majority stated that they prefer to study either in a group or with their friends or peers. Some continued to say that studying became even more effective when studying with friends or peers within their class or that were focusing on the same subject that they were.

While it appears that the majority of students prefer to study with friends or peers, not everyone will agree to do so. In the end, do what is most effective for you, whether that be studying by yourself or in a group. Study hard, and be successful this semester.